The Penguin Lyric Interpretations
Discography

Listings:

    A
    B
    C
    D
    E
    F
    G
    H
    I
    J
    K
    L
    M
    N
    O
    P
    Q
    R
    S
    T
    U
    V
    W
    X
    Y
    Z
Return To
The Penguin


D.W. Suite

Lyrics

Written by Lindsey Buckingham.

Contributors to this interpretation included: Lauren Leichter, Les, Justine, Tracy G. and Alexa. (October 03, 1999)



"If we go, go insane, we can all go together..."

"D.W. Suite," is the final song on Lindsey Buckingham's second solo album, Go Insane. In the three movements that surround this musical piece, Lindsey explores the feelings of what going insane feels like, while also paying homage to one of his strongest musical influences, the Beach Boys, and in particular, his feelings surrounding the death of Dennis Wilson. This combined with Lindsey's own feelings about loss and change, are tied together into this one, final homage.

"D.W. Suite" is not a song, it is a suite. According to Lindsey "it's three different movements and it's very cinematic. I like to think of it in that way because the threads that bind the three movements are quite cinematic." (Jim Ladd Interview, 1984). The whole of its elements including the vocal stylings, the production techniques, the three different movements of the suite, all merge together to create a message and feeling that far outweigh what the lyrics alone can communicate.

Lindsey had this to say about "D.W. Suite:" "D.W. Suite" really was written right after Dennis Wilson died. And uh, about two days after that happened - and I was quite upset by that - I locked myself in the studio and recorded this whole thing. I emerged a week later with the "D.W. Suite." It was, to me - the visual that I had - it can refer to anything obviously - going insane together- can refer to anything and anyone can relate to it in their own specific way. But I was thinking in terms of the Beach Boys, really, and the death of Dennis Wilson inspired the composing of this particular tune." (Jim Ladd Interview 1984).

With it's Irish and American-folk roots, the music of the three movements is uplifting at points and shadowed by darkness at others. It is reminiscent of youth turned sour, dreams gone bad, and happiness turned sad. The ending movement is enveloped by happiness with a joyous marching theme that completes the suite. "D. W. Suite" is not only a tribute to Dennis Wilson and all of the Beach Boys, but to everyone, including Lindsey, who has at one time or another felt a little insane and gone from this world.

A. The Wish.

"If we go, go insane
We can all go together
In this wild, wanton world
We can all break down forever . . ."

"I want to go, go forever
I want to go, go forever
It's just a memory
It's just a memory
It's just a memory . . .
Gone forever . . .
Gone forever . . ."

Musically, this first part of the song starts out with a child-like innocence, masking the darkness of the lyrics. However, by the end of the fading lyrics, the music is much more reminiscent of a path followed by fear and pain. The child has disappeared and the feeling of insanity has begun.

"It starts out almost with a death wish, which is D.W., and says 'If we go insane, we can all go together.' I see all of the Wilson's as having gone insane together... Of course, Brian Wilson had always been such a big influence on me that when Dennis died, it got me thinking about the Beach Boys and the rough time that they've had all around, really, and the fact that Brian went from a very commercial format into a far more experimental and how he suffered for it. That, plus the things I'm trying to do, were all sort of floating around . . . ." (Lindsey Buckingham, Illinois Entertainer, November 1984).

Here, Lindsey is tying together his feelings about the Wilson brothers and how they all went a little insane in a matter of speaking, through their creativity, trying to change musically and artistically, trying to grow - all things Lindsey can relate to in his own artistic and musical life both with Fleetwood Mac and on his own. He has a wish to get away from it all, yet he wants to go on forever, which is what he sees in the Beach Boys. Obviously they didn't go on forever as Dennis Wilson died. Lindsey now realizes the innocence is gone and feelings of madness has set in. Lindsey shows this best when the sweetness of the music turns sour by the end of the first movement.

B. The Prayer

"The closing of a chapter
The opening of a door
Brings forth life
Where there was no life before
I won't be here; I'll be watching from above
Always do you should
Always be good
And when push comes to shove."

"Pray for guidance from above
Shadow all your hopes with love
Live your life without a doubt
Outside in, inside out
Pray for guidance from above
Shadow all your hopes with love
Never be afraid, never be afraid
Pray for guidance from above."

"The closing of a chapter
The opening of a door
Brings forth life
Where there was no life before."

Movement two, "the Prayer" is a reflection of the feelings and emotions felt when someone you care about is gone. Dennis Wilson has died and Lindsey is reflecting (consciously or not) not only on Dennis' life but his own and his feelings surrounding his own losses, one of which may be that of his father. As well, he is possibly reflecting on a lot of things in his life he feels are "lost" or "misdirected." It is interesting that although the lyrics are somewhat somber, the music and vocals are very uplifting. Lindsey is no stranger to writing dark lyrics with joyous musical overtones or vice versa. He is a master at mixing his songs to match any range of feelings that may stem from himself at that time. If you listen carefully, you will hear the definite Beach Boys-style harmonies and background vocals in this movement of the song.

We see here that the prayer is actually a dream for the deliverance of the right words to turn a loss into something new. Everywhere a life ends, a new one begins - no matter if the loss is a person, a dream, or a vision. Lindsey is imagining Dennis delivering the lines to this movement and what he might say.

If you pray from guidance from above and you believe, then there is something better waiting for you after you are gone. This part seems to be partly religious (when God closes a door, somewhere he opens a window) and partly joyful, surrounded by a chorus of voices fervently offering hope and love. The opening of a door is very startling and is about starting life over, not only after death but even after feelings of insanity and doubt. The prayer wishes to put those things at peace. It is not just Dennis speaking to his family and to Lindsey but it is much more. It is saying "don't get too caught up in the way you live your life. Look for help from above, always love, and never be afraid."

C. The Reflection

(instrumental)

The last and final movement, "The Reflection" is the traditional Irish music with a flute, like a wake, getting faster and faster like the realization that life goes on. It is a dance of joy and a dance of insanity for those lost to the world. It is the reflection upon what has passed and the point at which a new life must begin. It ends as an Irish jig, which is uplifting and joyous. In Lindsey's own words, "let's pause for a moment.. but then life must go on."


"If we go, go insane, we can all go together..."

"D.W. Suite," is the final song on Lindsey Buckingham's second solo album, Go Insane. In the three movements that surround this musical piece, Lindsey explores the feelings of what going insane feels like, while also paying homage to one of his strongest musical influences, the Beach Boys, and in particular, his feelings surrounding the death of Dennis Wilson. This combined with Lindsey's own feelings about loss and change, are tied together into this one, final homage.

"D.W. Suite" is not a song, it is a suite. According to Lindsey "it's three different movements and it's very cinematic. I like to think of it in that way because the threads that bind the three movements are quite cinematic." (Jim Ladd Interview, 1984). The whole of its elements including the vocal stylings, the production techniques, the three different movements of the suite, all merge together to create a message and feeling that far outweigh what the lyrics alone can communicate.

Lindsey had this to say about "D.W. Suite:" "D.W. Suite" really was written right after Dennis Wilson died. And uh, about two days after that happened - and I was quite upset by that - I locked myself in the studio and recorded this whole thing. I emerged a week later with the "D.W. Suite." It was, to me - the visual that I had - it can refer to anything obviously - going insane together- can refer to anything and anyone can relate to it in their own specific way. But I was thinking in terms of the Beach Boys, really, and the death of Dennis Wilson inspired the composing of this particular tune." (Jim Ladd Interview 1984).

With it's Irish and American-folk roots, the music of the three movements is uplifting at points and shadowed by darkness at others. It is reminiscent of youth turned sour, dreams gone bad, and happiness turned sad. The ending movement is enveloped by happiness with a joyous marching theme that completes the suite. "D. W. Suite" is not only a tribute to Dennis Wilson and all of the Beach Boys, but to everyone, including Lindsey, who has at one time or another felt a little insane and gone from this world.

A. The Wish.

"If we go, go insane
We can all go together
In this wild, wanton world
We can all break down forever . . ."

"I want to go, go forever
I want to go, go forever
It's just a memory
It's just a memory
It's just a memory . . .
Gone forever . . .
Gone forever . . ."

Musically, this first part of the song starts out with a child-like innocence, masking the darkness of the lyrics. However, by the end of the fading lyrics, the music is much more reminiscent of a path followed by fear and pain. The child has disappeared and the feeling of insanity has begun.

"It starts out almost with a death wish, which is D.W., and says 'If we go insane, we can all go together.' I see all of the Wilson's as having gone insane together... Of course, Brian Wilson had always been such a big influence on me that when Dennis died, it got me thinking about the Beach Boys and the rough time that they've had all around, really, and the fact that Brian went from a very commercial format into a far more experimental and how he suffered for it. That, plus the things I'm trying to do, were all sort of floating around . . . ." (Lindsey Buckingham, Illinois Entertainer, November 1984).

Here, Lindsey is tying together his feelings about the Wilson brothers and how they all went a little insane in a matter of speaking, through their creativity, trying to change musically and artistically, trying to grow - all things Lindsey can relate to in his own artistic and musical life both with Fleetwood Mac and on his own. He has a wish to get away from it all, yet he wants to go on forever, which is what he sees in the Beach Boys. Obviously they didn't go on forever as Dennis Wilson died. Lindsey now realizes the innocence is gone and feelings of madness has set in. Lindsey shows this best when the sweetness of the music turns sour by the end of the first movement.

B. The Prayer

"The closing of a chapter
The opening of a door
Brings forth life
Where there was no life before
I won't be here; I'll be watching from above
Always do you should
Always be good
And when push comes to shove."

"Pray for guidance from above
Shadow all your hopes with love
Live your life without a doubt
Outside in, inside out
Pray for guidance from above
Shadow all your hopes with love
Never be afraid, never be afraid
Pray for guidance from above."

"The closing of a chapter
The opening of a door
Brings forth life
Where there was no life before."

Movement two, "the Prayer" is a reflection of the feelings and emotions felt when someone you care about is gone. Dennis Wilson has died and Lindsey is reflecting (consciously or not) not only on Dennis' life but his own and his feelings surrounding his own losses, one of which may be that of his father. As well, he is possibly reflecting on a lot of things in his life he feels are "lost" or "misdirected." It is interesting that although the lyrics are somewhat somber, the music and vocals are very uplifting. Lindsey is no stranger to writing dark lyrics with joyous musical overtones or vice versa. He is a master at mixing his songs to match any range of feelings that may stem from himself at that time. If you listen carefully, you will hear the definite Beach Boys-style harmonies and background vocals in this movement of the song.

We see here that the prayer is actually a dream for the deliverance of the right words to turn a loss into something new. Everywhere a life ends, a new one begins - no matter if the loss is a person, a dream, or a vision. Lindsey is imagining Dennis delivering the lines to this movement and what he might say.

If you pray from guidance from above and you believe, then there is something better waiting for you after you are gone. This part seems to be partly religious (when God closes a door, somewhere he opens a window) and partly joyful, surrounded by a chorus of voices fervently offering hope and love. The opening of a door is very startling and is about starting life over, not only after death but even after feelings of insanity and doubt. The prayer wishes to put those things at peace. It is not just Dennis speaking to his family and to Lindsey but it is much more. It is saying "don't get too caught up in the way you live your life. Look for help from above, always love, and never be afraid."

C. The Reflection

(instrumental)

The last and final movement, "The Reflection" is the traditional Irish music with a flute, like a wake, getting faster and faster like the realization that life goes on. It is a dance of joy and a dance of insanity for those lost to the world. It is the reflection upon what has passed and the point at which a new life must begin. It ends as an Irish jig, which is uplifting and joyous. In Lindsey's own words, "let's pause for a moment.. but then life must go on."

Transcribed to HTML by Marty Adelson.

Copyright 1995-2001, Martin and Lisa Adelson
All Rights Reserved.