Cincinnati Post 6-4-98

Nicks' songwriting, delivery keep their power to enchant
By Wayne Perry

She doesn't even have to sing a note. She can just stand on stage, spinning and twirling, fringe on her shawl floating in the breeze. Arms outstretched, she seems to float. The crowd roars.

Such is the charm and mystique of Stevie Nicks. She's frills and fans, leather and lace, blue denim and 5-inch heels.

But you don't pay $52.50 for a top ticket just to see her whirling-dervish act and to admire her eccentric wardrobe. You want her to sing. And she did sing - nearly 20 songs in a two-hour show Wednesday night at Riverbend Music Center.

Fresh off the aborted Fleetwood Mac tour, Ms. Nicks was relaxed and confident.

"This is the one and only time, until another 15 years go by, that I can do a tour to back up a boxed set," joked Ms. Nicks. Her new retrospective "Enchanted" features three CDs with 46 tracks.

"I can sing some songs I rarely get to perform," she said.

She did that just, with selections like "Enchanted," "Sleeping Angel" and "Twisted."

And a very talkative, personable Ms. Nicks shared an "electric acoustic trilogy" of her early works - "After The Glitter Fades," "Garbo" and "Rose Garden."

Unlike her last solo tour, Ms. Nicks reached back into the Fleetwood Mac catalog this time, singing "Dreams" and "Rhiannon."

And the crowd of 8,577 was on its feet for her biggest hits - "Stand Back," "Edge of Seventeen" and "Stop Draggin' My Heart Around."

The only quibble fans may have had was that there was only one encore. The evening would have been even better if Ms. Nicks had been tempted back on stage and wrapped things up with "Gypsy" and "I Can't Wait."

Boz Scaggs' opening set was under-appreciated by an audience that had barely settled down before his short (50 minute) performance had ended.

Boomers who grew up with his "Silk Degrees" album in the '70s enjoyed the performance the most when Boz launched into "Lowdown" and "Lido Shuffle." But it was his rhythm and blues numbers that Scaggs himself got into, particularly "Loan Me A Dime."

Thanks to CL Moon for sending this article to us.